Tag Archives: youtube

3 Star Trek films you never knew existed (probably)

Star Trek: Axanar (trailer)

This trailer is totally awesome and I am sooooo watching the film when it’s released. Also, don’t miss out on the Prelude to Axanar short, also on YouTube.

Star Trek: Axanar is coming out some time next year (2016).

Star Trek: Horizon (opening scene)

Star Trek: Horizon is a full length fan film set it the Enterprise era (think Scott Bakula as Captain Archer). To be perfectly honest, I can’t say I really like the Star Trek: Horizon trailer but the opening scene makes up for it. Alas, Horizon is another one we have to wait for, but only until February next year (2016).

Star Trek: Aurora

Ok, so it’s not a movie, but it’s still really good, so check it out.

And now, for something a little different…

…the Star Wars: Dark Resurrection Vol. 0 trailer. It’s an Italian-made fan film (in Italian, but there are English subtitles), and it looks really good. There’s also a Vol. 1 and funding is currently being raised for Vol. 2, so we won’t be left on a cliffhanger.

Riviera Film, the filmmakers behind it, have a number of other great sci-fi films on their YouTube channel. If you like Dark Resurrection don’t forget to check it out!

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Revising Hero and the Pantser's Beat Sheet

A screenshot of the 7-point plot system
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The revision of Hero, using the 7-point plot system

Just after Christmas, I finished the first draft of Hero and since the New Year I’ve been hard at work on the second draft. Dan Wells’s 7-point plot system (aka the Pantser’s Beat Sheet) has been incredibly helpful during the revision process – particularly the layering process (explained in part 5 of Dan Wells’s lecture, available on YouTube) – and it too has undergone a revision. Continue reading

Beat sheet to the rescue, pantser-style

The 7-point plot system, applied to Hero-Fink.
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The 7-point plot system really helped me to nail my plot.

A few weeks ago, I was at the half-way point of my first draft and having trouble with my plot. After ten months of steadily pounding away at the keyboard and chipping at the word count, I was increasing asking myself “what the $#*! happens now?” Although I knew what was going to happen at the end of my story, I didn’t know:

  1. how I was going to get there, or
  2. how all of my subplots were meant to tie in.

And frankly, it was driving me batty. Continue reading